Quitting 101 for Writers

quitProbably the biggest complaint I hear from writers is that they “don’t have enough time” to write.

This is usually followed, in the next breath, by listing all the things they’ve got going. All the social events, clubs, projects, volunteer activities, charity work, parental commitments, etc., they have been participating in.  And then how exhausted they are.  And how they can’t fit writing in anywhere.

Even though writing is supposedly a “priority.”

Even though publishing is “all they have ever dreamed of doing” with their lives.

The problem is, no matter how much of a priority something is, if you’re not making time for it, it really isn’t a priority. No matter how many times you call it that.

Actions speak louder than words. If you say writing is a priority, then take action to make it a priority!

So, how do you make time for writing? By quitting.

What?! “Quit,” you say? But winners never quit and quitters never win!

I beg to differ.

When is Quitting Okay?

How many of you struggle with quitting reading a book that you hate or that’s boring?  How many of you are still volunteering for something that no longer interests you or that you’ve come to dread?

Quitting, even something you’ve come to despise, can be really unpleasant for some folks.

But in order to make writing a priority, you can’t just talk about it.  You have to really make it one of the most important things in your life (maybe behind your kids, spouse, health . . . things like that). Remember this, again:  actions speak louder than words.

So, when is quitting okay?

When you’re doing too much –We often do all the things, volunteer for everything, and accept every invitation because of FOMO (Fear of Missing Out).  But you can’t do everything, so it’s okay to be selective. There’s only so much time in a day, and spreading yourself thin can be hard on your health, family, and most definitely any chance you have of starting or maintaining a writing career.

When you’re doing things that aren’t yours to do – Are there things you’re doing that really should be the responsibility of someone else?  Or could they be someone else’s responsibility?  Delegating is a parent’s best friend. No one says you have to clean up after everyone or cook all the meals or drive all the carpools.  If a task can (or should) be done by someone else, hand them their responsibility and stop doing it all yourself.

When you’re only doing it out of habit — Just because you’ve been watching the same soap opera every day for the last ten years, doesn’t mean you have to keep watching it. If you’re only watching it out of habit and not really enjoying the rehashed plotlines, it’s time to quit.

When you’re only doing it because you spent money on it – This is a big one and really hard to get past for some people.  Even if you spent money on something, if it no longer brings you joy, quit. So what if you invested $1000 on piano lessons?  If practicing bores you to tears, you suck at it, and you don’t love it anymore, there’s no reason to keep pursuing it. You may have invested your money, but stop investing your time on something you dislike doing.

When you’re only doing it because someone else expects you to – Did you join a club because your friend begged you to, only to find that you no longer care?  Quit.  If your friend is a true friend, they will understand that you need to make writing a priority in your life.

When what you’re doing doesn’t support your goals — Don’t let saying “yes” become more important than reaching your own goals and dreams.   If the activity in question isn’t supportive of what you’re reaching for in your life, it’s time to quit.  If it doesn’t bring you joy, quit.

How (and What) to Quit

Once you’ve made the decision to quit those extraneous things in your life to make more time to write, how do you go about it?  How do you decide what has to stay and what can go?

Make a pros and cons list –  Not sure whether you still want to belong to the service club you’ve belonged to for ten years?  What do you like about it? What do you dislike about it? If there are any cons, consider quitting if there’s no passion left.

Ask for outside opinions from trusted friends or family – Is there anything in your life that they have been telling you to quit?  Ask for their honest thoughts . . . keeping in mind that if you’re trying to quit an activity that they are invested in, they might not be the right person to ask.

Figure out how much extra time you’ll gain by quitting –  How much time do you spend at each of your activities on a weekly basis?  Start by calculating the most time-consuming activity you participate in, and see if it still seems as appealing, if quitting it could give you back that equally large amount of writing time.

Finally, try applying the KonMari method – From the crazy popular book The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up by Marie Kondo, this is really meant to tidy up your life by getting rid of material things that no longer bring you joy.  Applying this same method to the activities you participate in, though, could have an amazing effect on the time you have available to write!

One thing Kondo suggests in the book is clearing out all at once, rather than little by little.  Throwing one thing out a day isn’t going to clean your house up fast. On the other hand, ridding your house, all at the same time, of every item of clothing that isn’t bringing you joy will feel so good, you will be less likely to “relapse” into bad habits or add more things to your wardrobe that leave you joy-less.

Same with that long list of activities you participate in!  Try listing all the things you do (aside from the necessary things, like feeding your kids and getting regular dental checkups) and then go through them one by one, all at the same time, and decide what really brings you joy.

“Start by discarding,” says Kondo. “Then organize your space, thoroughly, completely, in one go.” [Emphasis mine.]

And by “space,” in this instance, we’re talking about your writing “space” – the time you spend, or want to spend – pursuing your goals and dreams.

Once you know what brings you joy, you know what to keep.  Ditch the rest.  Be a quitter and make time for the writing that you love and want more time for!

Final Quitting Thoughts

Remember, nothing is permanent.  If you quit something and then later find you miss it too much, you can always go back. As long as you aren’t doing it to procrastinate from writing.

If the idea of the KonMari method and quitting things all at once is a bit too much, or if you’re just not sure you want to give up a particular thing yet, at least commit to checking in again in six months to see if you still feel the same about it.  Once you’ve got the idea in your head that you may want to quit this activity, you might find all kinds of reasons cropping up that support this.

Another thing to keep in mind is that we’re talking about quitting things that prevent you from writing — writing that you have determined is a priority for you.

Quitting 101 isn’t a primer on how to quit writing.  Writing is hard work and not always fun.  But there’s a huge difference between quitting something because it’s hard sometimes and quitting something because it leaves you no room for what’s really important in your life.

If you’ve committed to a writing career and decided it is your priority, then look for things to quit that don’t support this priority.

Being a quitter isn’t always bad. Quit the right things. For the right reasons.

And then go Rock Your Writing with all that free time you have.

~  Shannon McKelden

Say No to the Multitasking Mistake

multitasking
Photo courtesy of: https://www.flickr.com/photos/ihavezlatathoughts/

We live in a world that is full of the drive to do more, more, more.  As writers, we suffer from this expectation maybe more than a lot of other people.

We are expected to write more, blog more, market more, be visible on social media more.  It is all Important, with a capital I.  Not doing all these things constitutes failure as a writer. Doesn’t it?

So a lot of us turn to multitasking.

What is Multitasking?

How many of you carry on multiple Twitter conversations while writing?  Or work on more than one book at once. (And by “at once” I mean at the same sitting, maybe even on separate screens.)

How many of you watch TV while working on copyedits or play solitaire while writing your rough draft?  Anyone ever burned dinner because you were sucked into some black hole of research?

The “busy-ness” of multitasking makes us feel like we’re getting a lot done.  If we’re honest about it, though, in most of the above cases, multitasking is really just another term for “unable to concentrate on what I’m supposed to be doing.”

So what exactly is multitasking?  Multitasking is doing more than one thing, side-by-side, which requires one’s attention to be given equally to each.  But since your brain cannot actually focus on two things simultaneously, what you are really doing is switching your attention back and forth between the two things.

Write a paragraph, answer an email, write another paragraph, answer another email. You’re not really working on both at the same time. You’re alternating between two separate things, each of which requires your brain’s undivided attention at the time of the doing.

Writers and Multitasking

Keep in mind that, by “multitasking,” I don’t mean doing different writerly things on different days or at separate times. As a working writer, or one trying to establish relationships with their Right Readers, for example, you may need to assign different tasks to different days.  Writing Monday through Thursday, bookkeeping on Fridays, marketing on weekends.

Alternatively, some writers divide their days into different types of tasks…writing in the mornings and answering emails and doing other business-related tasks in the afternoon.   None of these examples really falls into the category of multitasking because you are focusing on one task at a time.

Sometimes you have to make time for other tasks besides writing spur-of-the-moment. If you’re published, you’ve probably been deep into the first draft of a new book, only to get your editorial letter or your copy edits and have to completely shift gears.  There’s not much you can do about that…because you likely have a deadline.

How Multitasking Affects the Writing

When it comes to the effects of multitasking on the writing, these are the main issues:

  • Decreased productivity. While multitasking may make you feel busy, scientists estimate that productivity is actually decreased by 40% when you’re doing more than one thing concurrently.

Switching your focus to something other than the writing every couple of minutes has the same effect as if you saved your document and closed your program after a few paragraphs, only to need to wait for it to open again to work on it once more a few minutes later.

When you work on something else, then come back to the writing, you have to reboot your brain to get reacquainted with where you were before you can start again. If you’d just kept going, that “reboot” time could have been spent actually writing.

  • Loss of focus. If the words aren’t flowing easily, they certainly aren’t going to flow any better if you allow yourself to shift focus to something else instead, even for a few minutes. You’d be better off staring into space when things aren’t flowing, and letting your brain work out the problem, instead of giving it something completely different to do.
  • Increase in mistakes. Typos, skipping important information in a scene, calling a secondary character by the wrong name.  Sometimes, when you’ve switched tasks, your brain is still back on the other one, which can cause errors.  Another way mistakes can increase is by loss of continuity.  Copy editing while watching TV can cause you to skip sentences. Your focus is pulled away to the television, and when you come back, you don’t go quite back to where you ended, and you miss something.
  • Greater stress level. Yes, believe it or not, task-switching increases adrenaline in your system and actually increases your stress level! While working on your manuscript, your mind may be stressing out over what you might be missing on Facebook.
  • Decreased likelihood of finishing things…like your work in progress. Starting multiple stories and working on them all at once means it’s going to take longer to get these things completed…if they ever do get finished. (You’re liable to get bored with one or both and move on to yet another shiny pretty new things before ever completing any of it.) Multitasking produces activity, not accomplishment.

 

Multitasking Solutions

Are we ever going to be able to get rid of multitasking completely?   Probably not.

But if you’re struggling to get that chapter done, feeling like you’re never quite “in the zone,” wondering why you feel like you’re missing opportunities on Twitter or Facebook to communicate with your readers, finding yourself making mistakes…STOP. Take a look at  your work habits.

It could be that you’re never giving one task all of your attention for any length of time.

Here are a few solutions to making the mistake of multitasking.

  • De-socialize. Turn off email and social media notifications while working. Don’t answer the phone. No one is going to miss you for an hour or two. When you’ve completed your writing for the day, feel free to play on Twitter all you want, giving it all your attention instead of only half of it.
  • Save things for later. DVR your favorite shows if they come on during your writing time. The show will be just as good at another time. Bonus…you will likely pay more attention to the show AND be able to skip commercials.
  • Get rid of distractions. Delete Candy Crush or any other addiction from your phone or computer.  If it’s not there, you won’t be tempted to just “play one more level” between paragraphs. Change when you write.  If all your writing friends hit Twitter at 6 p.m., can you write before that, so you aren’t tempted to multitask?
  • Check into distraction-free writing tools that will help keep you focused.
  • Schedule your tasks and your downtime. Put a day without writing on your calendar, and take care of personal things on that day, or feel free to explore marketing or social media more in depth. Schedule a couple of hours of research time in the morning and then work on the scenes you were gathering research for in the afternoon.  Don’t research as you go.

With a bit of adjustment, you can disable the multitasking bug most of the time.  You’ll find that once you’re focusing better on one task at a time, you’ll accomplish more, faster, and better.

Last month when I wrote my blog post for Rock Your Writing, it took me nearly a week of evenings. This month it took me a few hours one evening, including research time.

Why the big difference?  Last month I wrote while watching TV each night. (And if you don’t think Sam and Dean can take your focus away from what you’re supposed to be doing, you’ve never watched Supernatural.)

This month I turned off the TV and concentrated on one thing, researching and writing my blog post. It took me a fifth of the time.

If that’s not proof of the evils of multitasking, I don’t know what is.

Where do you find multitasking tripping you up?  How do you solve the problem? I’d love to hear your ideas!

Rock Your Writing!

~Shannon McKelden

How to Achieve Your Writing Goals This Year

How to Achieve Your Writing Goals This YearThis is the year. The year you’re finally going to:

  • Finish that book.
  • Write that book.
  • Stick to a writing schedule.
  • Get an agent.
  • Self publish.
  • (Fill in the blank.)

You get the idea. It’s New Year’s, the time of resolutions. We resolve that this year will be different — not like last year, where we made up a list and didn’t follow through.

Or the year before that. Or the few years before that, really. 

The definition of insanity.

They say the definition of insanity is doing the same thing, but expecting different results.  In other words, saying this year will be different, but approaching it the exact same way (with a list and a lot of resolve)… which has almost no chance of succeeding, because the process itself is flawed.

That doesn’t mean “don’t make resolutions”, mind you.

It means change your approach. 

What do you want?

First off, you’ll want to tighten your resolution up and create a specific goal, one with a clear marker of accomplishment.  Saying you’ll finally write a book this year is good, but also vague.  Pick a project. If you don’t have a project, might say you’ll want to write one type of book, in rough draft, by the end of the year.  So instead of “I’ll write a book this year” you can say “I will write one Epic Fantasy novel, in rough draft, by December 31, 2015.”

Then… WRITE. IT. DOWN.

Seriously. Written plans are twice as likely to succeed as unwritten ones. Putting it somewhere you’ll see it (and actually register it and refer to it) would be even more helpful, but the act of writing it down is a crucial first step. 

Why do you want it?

The next question (the Motivation to your Goal, for my fellow GMC fans!) is:  why do you want it?  And what’s the why behind the why?

Knowing what motivates you — why the goal is truly important — is often the key to what’s standing in your way. The more important it is to you, the scarier it is. The more afraid you are, the more you’ll find yourself sabotaging yourself, actively or passively, to try and escape the perceived pain of the achievement (or failure).  On the other hand, if it isn’t that important to you (or if you haven’t identified why it is), the more likely you are to get sidetracked by other shiny objects.

So why do you want to write?  Don’t just think about it.  Write that down, as well.

What are your pain points and obstacles?

You don’t sit down and write a book in one clip. (At least, no writer I know does!)  Books are made of chapters, which are made of scenes, which are made of sentences, which are made of words. It’s a cumulative effort. If you’re the planning sort, outline. If you’re not, at least have a rough idea of how many words you’ll need to complete by the end of the year to get a ballpark estimate. (I would also strongly recommend at least sketching out preliminary plot points, so you know where you’re heading.)

Then, look at the last year. What stopped you from writing? What do you know is a stumbling block? For me, writing fiction after lunch is a crap shoot: my natural energy is low until about 5 pm. I’m more likely to get that scene written first thing in the morning or after 8 pm.  Also, if I’ve got more than three calls scheduled in a day, I’m usually too brain dead to accomplish anything… so if I didn’t get writing done first thing in the morning, it just isn’t getting done.

What’s stopping you?  Lack of plans?  Lack of energy?  The dreaded inertia, where you know you “should” write but you either find something more fun to do, or convince yourself that something unimportant “must happen now”? 

What’s your plan?

If you know you self-sabotage, for example, when you’re about to say “yes” to a pointless project in order to avoid writing, make sure you say NO. Write down: “if so-and-so asks me to run the PTA walkathon, I will say no.  If Carol Sueann says they need me to be treasurer for the RWA chapter, I will say thank you, but I can’t this year.  If Bob from accounting asks me to join the bowling league, I will say I’m already booked evenings.”  Writing down your plan, again, will make you more likely to actually pull it off when the moment arises.

More than how you’ll avoid problems, write down your plan to actually execute your resolution.  Want to write a book this year?  What will that take?  Let’s say you’re writing a 100,000 word high fantasy novel rough draft.  Will you need to write an outline or do research?  How long will that take?  You’re looking at around 400 pages of rough draft.  Will you have a daily word count?  Do you have time to rest and replenish?  When and where will you get writing (and rest! Don’t forget to schedule rest!) done?

Who is on your team?

I know, I know… I always say this. But I will keep saying it until it’s etched in your brain.

All writers write alone. No writer succeeds that way.

If you really want to pull off your writing resolution, you need a support network.  That can mean a critique partner, or group.  Beta readers, if need be. But most importantly, it means people who believe in you, and who hold you accountable.  These do not need to be the same people, but it helps if they are.

In Charles Duhigg’s book The Power of Habitthey discuss the need for belief.  That does not mean faith or metaphysics. It simply means that you accomplish the habit because you believe that it can be accomplished, and that you have what it takes to do so.  If you don’t, you can establish the routine, and then keep it up if you’ve surrounded yourself with key people that you trust who do believe.  In essence, they believe in you until you do.  These are people whose opinions you trust. Much as you may love your mother, if she says “well, of course you can write a book!” and you feel like she’s just saying that because she has to, the belief will have a lot less weight with your subconscious than a fellow writer whose work you admire, even if she is unpublished.  Find online writers or face-to-face meet ups, but be sure you have a network. 

When will you reach out?

Having the team won’t help if you’re not communicating.

Since many writers are introverts, what often happens is, the writing will get rough, we’ll suddenly become convinced that what we’ve got is utter crap, and by God, we’ll just retreat into our hamster balls and isolate.  Telling someone we’re in trouble is tantamount to admitting we’re impostors: that our writing truly is crap, and the people who we admire and respect will suddenly realize that, as well.

Write down a list of “I have lost complete perspective when…” signs.  Set regular check-in dates with your support network.  And show someone your work sooner than you think you should if you find yourself getting stuck and falling way off track.

Which leads us to the final point… 

If you want to change it, you have to track it.

If you want to write that book by the end of the year, then you need milestones.  You need to set some smaller goals — those “one bite at a time” chunks that time management pros keep nattering on about — and then set some deadlines.  You’ll also want to check in every week.  (Yes, every week.)  Avoid the very nasty habit of falling behind for a week, and then saying “I’ll write twice as much next week.”  Give yourself plenty of buffer room, and make the goals manageable (and then maybe double the time, especially if this is your first book.)

The key is to start giving your subconscious some “wins.”  Meet your admittedly easy goal a few weeks in a row, and suddenly, your subconscious will start thinking “I am a person who meets her goals.”  It generates momentum.

If you aren’t meeting your goals, checking in weekly will help you figure out how you got off course. That examination will also help you discover how to get back on course: whether it’s talking to a mentor or critique partner, doing a little more research, or getting a little more replenishment (and adjusting your timelines accordingly.) 

You can do it.

Count me among those who believe in you.  I think next year is going to be an amazing year for writers.

So… what’s your resolution for the upcoming year — and what are you going to do about it?

2013: The Year of Confluence

Whew.  Just like being back from any vacation, I’ve been getting my bearings back from an entire Year of Cruise.

I learned a ton of things. I did a ton of things — most of them unexpectedly.  I essentially “pantsed” an entire year, and now live to tell the tale.

The biggest takeaways:

1.  Assume distractions have valuable information.

In 2012, I discovered Permaculture because I took a little detour into researching organic farming.  I discovered a whole new way to look at promotion and tribe building by researching presidential campaigns (and I’m not even political.)  I also learned the connections between exercise (specifically flexibility, strength training and stamina training) and their corresponding elements in writing, discovered the creative benefits of a hot cup of tea. Oh, and I discovered how holograms can be both a metaphor and just plain cool.

Any other year, I’d probably have berated myself for “wasting time” in pursuing these weird little pointless eddies of information.  Now I know: keep an eye out for the clue. Because sure enough, every single time, there was one… and it usually wound up being an unexpected harbinger for greater things, a way to see smaller patterns contributing to larger ones.

2.  Qualities are the seeds of motivation.

I started the Year of Cruise with the premise that I’d focus on qualities, rather than goals.  I knew I wanted to be less stressed; that I wanted ease and comfort and curiosity. (That mostly worked, incidentally.)  The real gift to that, though, was asking myself:  well, if I want to feel this, what exactly does that mean?  What elements in my life contribute to that?  And what’s standing in the way?

(Note:  External GMC, anyone? Yes, I felt like an idiot.)

Ease and comfort took a number of forms.  It meant pushing back some deadlines.  Looking at exactly what my finances could bear, and pruning away things that I didn’t need, both in terms of expenses and assignments/work.

It’s funny — when I was younger, I used to think that ease and lack of stress meant shying away from the brutal realities of finances, or perhaps avoiding the unpleasant confrontations of saying “no” to demanding clients/employers.  Now, I discovered: that initial pain is the key to the gateway to ease.

I’m sure to many of you this seems obvious, but to me, it was a crucial shift.

3.  Everything is everything.

In using the year for exploration and self-examination, I was able to reconfirm and clarify my life’s mission:  I want to show other people that it’s possible to live a sustainable, creative life, despite the obstacles and the fear and the nay-saying of the outside world.

This is usually the theme of my fiction; it’s the foundation of Rock Your Writing.

I teach people that despite the crazy-ass nature of our business, it is possible to actually complete a novel, publish same, and figure out how to make a living, albeit not necessarily an opulent one.  No matter how long the odds or how much you may have felt you’ve “screwed up” in the past, you can do this.  I’m living proof.

Once I reconnected with that, I saw where everything else I was pursuing fed into that.  Looking at everything through the lens of the mission suddenly focused everything — just like reconnecting each scene in a novel with the primary story question and primary character GMC.

Even things like taking care of my son and cleaning my house suddenly clicked into the pattern:  following dreams and being able to sustain a living without working every second of the day was something I want my Boy to learn, so I am showing him that.  I want to write more efficiently — it’s easier to do with a clear desk and, strangely, a tidy kitchen.

Making the choice to connect everything to the central question suddenly added fuel and value stacking to everything I did.

I declare 2013 “The Year of Confluence.”

According to Miriam Webster, “Confluence” is defined as:

“a coming or flowing together, meeting, or gathering at one point.”

It seems like I’ve spent the past few decades chasing seemingly tangentially related elements and trying to juggle a million things.  Taking the past year “off” — as it were — gave me the space and the ease to get a big picture snap.

A “confluence” of what?

Everything.

Managing time to write.

Value stacking everything else you do to make writing easier.

Promoting in a way that is efficient, effective, and sane.

Publishing in a way that supports what you’re trying to achieve.

Writing in a way that supports your life, how you want to publish, and what you’re trying to promote.

What would help you most?

To help me help you, to quote Jerry Maguire — what is it you feel you need the most when it comes to your writing?  What is the next level?  What do you feel is getting in the way of you achieving it?

Leave a comment, and please feel free to share this.  I’ve got big plans for this year, peeps — and some really great, simple tools I’m dying to share.

Onward! To confluence! :D

Let Discomfort Be Your Guide

Sometimes I get overwhelmed.

Things go wrong. Or, conversely, things go unexpectedly right — only all at once.

I’m surrounded by a multitude of paths, and often feel like I have no map.  It’s hard to prioritize when seemingly everything is about the same level of important, or I can see where something’s going to lead so I feel like it’s not important but the end result is so I should aaaaaaagh.

Gordon, the Guided Missile.

John Cleese gave a keynote speech where he talks about Gordon, the Guided Missile.  Apparently, it’s a children’s book (about a guided missile, how cool is that?) where Gordon makes all these mistakes.  But he keeps checking in:  “am I doing it right now?”  “Nope, go a foot lower and to the left.”  “How about now?”  “A little more to the right.”  “Now?”  “Bit higher.”

Finally he hits the target, and there’s much rejoicing. (Yay!)

In time management — and in writing — a lot of times it’s about adjusting, listening to the inner voice that says “Nope, scoot that over a touch.”

My inner voice speaks discomfort.

I’ve discovered that when I’m feeling really swamped, the thing I need to pay attention to is the little nagging discomfort that I’m trying my best to ignore.

Note — this doesn’t mean painful.  It certainly doesn’t mean traumatizing.  I’m not looking at the hardest, gnarliest thing on my to-do list, or my biggest and most frightening writing project, slapping on my goggles, and just going for that sucker.

It’s the little, uncomfortable stretch. The thing I think about doing… and then, almost without realizing, switch to doing something else.  Like, say, alphabetizing the pantry.

I’ve noticed that my subconscious treats these little stretches like a cop:  “Whoa!  Unpleasant!  Move along, pal!  Nothing to see here!”

The really scary stuff?  Those, I’m able to see clearly, because my subconscious already knows I’ll say:  “What am I, nuts?  No way I’m going to do that!”

The little discomfort, though — there’s a real shot that I’ll do it.  So my subconscious quickly does what it can to derail me.

Short-boost-long-screw.

I think this is common.  When faced with these little discomforts, I tend to choose what I call the “short boost.”

A short boost is probably equal in intensity to discomfort:  playing a quick video game.  Reading a few pages in a new book.  Maybe grabbing an extra cup of coffee or something sweet.  Little throwaway things. My subconscious rationalizes:  I’m under stress.  This is a little thing.  I deserve it, right?

They call it “short term gain, long term loss.”  With prolonged exposure, the little “boost” turns into a “screw.”  As in, it screws me in the long run.  My way reminds me with a bit more sharpness.

Ultimately, I know what I need to do. My subconscious isn’t on board with the program, however… and will try to fake  me out.

Looking for the butler.

I’m sure I need to negotiate with some monsters.  My subconscious probably needs to get with the program.

Until then, since I’ve got this weird hiccup, I can use it.

It’s like a mystery novel.  As you’re reading, you see the big, obvious suspects, and then there’s one secondary character that says or does something that perks your interest, but only for a second – the butler mentioning that he never wears gloves twice, or whatever.  Then, it seems like everything is done to keep that character out of your line of site.  Invariably, that guy’s your killer.

If I look over my to do list, I see the usual suspects, as well — the  big projects, the looming deadlines.  But it’s never a big grandiose thing.  There’s this one little bastard that’s doing his best to get me to ignore him… and that’s where the juice is.

What about you?  What are the little things in your writing that you know would help, but you’ve been hesitant to take a step?